Illustrated Talks

Illustrated Talks

David Bevan offers the following range of talks. Each is illustrated with slides, and lasts approximately one hour. A variety of relevant literature and occasional live plants can be displayed.

CONSERVING NATURE IN LONDON

Many plants and animals have adapted to live alongside man in London. This talk explores the interface between humans and wildlife and how our urban environment may best be managed for the benefit of both.

THE NATURAL HISTORY OF THE GARDEN

Gardeners soon become aware that they do not have “vacant possession”. A great variety of wildlife co-exists within the garden. This talk describes some of the complex interrelationships of the plants and animals which live in our gardens.

GARDENING FOR WILDLIFE

At a time when so much of our wildlife is coming under increasing threat in the wider countryside, gardens can often provide an important sanctuary. This talk suggests ways in which our gardens might be more sympathetically managed to provide a home for a greater range of wildlife.

WILD FLOWERS IN THE GARDEN

This talk describes the wide variety of native wild flowers which may be grown in the garden. Many of our wild flowers are under threat in the countryside as their natural habitats are disappearing. By providing a sanctuary within the garden we can help to conserve some of our most attractive and endangered species. The relationship between native plants and the wildlife that depends upon them is discussed and illustrated. This talk includes a discussion concerning- the thorny problem of “weeds” and how to deal with them.

LONDON’S WILD FLOWERS

London supports a remarkable range of wild flowers – an extraordinary mixture of the exotic and the commonplace. This talk explores the highways and byways of our capital city and discusses the rich and unexpected nature of its wild flora.

WILDFLOWERS AND BUTTERFLIES

Gardens can provide homes for some of our most beautiful wild flowers. This talk describes how to grow them and how to encourage the butterflies that depend upon them. Many of our wild flowers and butterflies are under threat in their natural habitats. Gardens can provide a valuable sanctuary if managed sympathetically.

CREATING A BUTTERFLY GARDEN

These attractive -and familiar insects are becoming increasingly scarce in the countryside. The talk describes how to provide butterflies with a suitable habitat within the garden. The wide variety of British butterflies known to visit gardens are described and their requirements considered.

THE NATURAL HISTORY OF HARINGEY’S ANCIENT WOODLANDS

Haringey in North London is most fortunate in possessing no less than four ancient woodlands. Their rich and varied natural histories are examined in relation to differences in their past management. Recent changes following a renewal of coppicing are discussed. These woods support a rich bird life which includes all three British species of woodpecker, and hawfinches are known to breed in at least one of them.

THE NATURAL HISTORY OF THE NEW RIVER

London’s New River is an historic water course which has been bringing fresh water from Hertfordshire to Inner London for nearly 400 years. It is a priceless green asset, rich in plants, birds and animal life. This talk examines the natural history of the New River and its associated reservoirs and filter beds. Together they support a remarkable range of wildlife, which includes rare plants and unusual water birds.

WILDLIFE AT CHRISTMAS

What range of plants and animals can we expect to see at Christmas? What strategies have they evolved for survival in the depth of the winter? Our climate is changing, and the traditional “white Christmas” may soon become a distant memory. This talk discusses some of these issues in a light-hearted fashion, in keeping with the festive season.